Warning about the potential effect of the white heat of technology on traditional occupations or professions is of course a traditional pastime for commentators, politicians and particularly consultants. However, in what seems to have been an interesting debate at the Global Legal Summit, one is minded to side with Chris Osborne of FTI Consulting in his view that artificial intelligence is not going to put lawyers out of business just yet. Technology does breed complexity and it may still require skilled interlocutors to achieve the best effect. The underlying question for all legal businesses in this is: "How are we adding value to clients?". Understandably, while clients have been willing to pay professional rates for the "paper-shuffling" activities that are part of or ancillary to legal services then this has not been a question with any particular salience for many firms. It will be however, as clients increasingly expect such tasks to be done at rates that better reflect the effect of automation or acquire the technology to do the same tasks themselves. Professor Susskind's “entrepreneurial, imaginative and creative lawyers” of the future may be developing and marketing the technology, or they may be providing the kind of skilled interlocution that drives me to use a mortgage broker rather than negotiate the torture of the online application process offered by my bank. Either way, if there are to be "pure" law firms in the future, they may be a much more compact, experienced and flexible body than the majority of the current solicitors market. Perhaps even something like a barristers' chambers...